Buy a dry suit

We offer drysuits for sale and rental all year round. Going rollerblading or planning to kayak in colder weather conditions? With a dry suit, you can extend your paddling season exactly as long as you want. If you are not sure which model suits you best, you are welcome to contact us on 08-740 05 05 or butiken@langholmenkajak.se. If you happen to pass by our store, you are of course welcome to come in and try it on, and we will help you further with choosing a dry suit.

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The 5 most important things you should consider when buying a dry suit

If a wetsuit extends the season, it can be said that a drysuit gives you season all year round - you can also wear it against rain in summer. It's easier to put on and take off than a wetsuit, and you have plenty of room for woolen underwear in the winter. The suit is therefore not warming in itself, but it will keep you completely dry if you end up in the water. So remember to have something under it if it's cold, and before you close the zipper completely, squat down to force out as much air as possible.

1. Breathability

There are dry suits that are designed for sailing. Although sailing can sometimes be quite active, these are often too tight for you as a paddler, as they are made for sitting still. In a kayak, you are constantly mobile and get warm easily. That's why breathability is of the utmost importance when kayaking and you don't want to get soaked - from the inside! Feel free to bring a change of clothes close to your body - if you have packed properly to make it to the coffee break first, you will hardly be dry, no matter how good the suit's breathability is.

2. Mobility

Here it's mainly about choosing the right size - the vast majority of suits on the market are remarkably flexible once you've got them on. But make sure it's big enough so it doesn't tighten your shoulders. And remember that you must have room for the undergarment.

3. Neck: Neoprene or latex?

If you know that you will be both in and under the water often, if you work as a self-rescue instructor or engage in role training, then you should definitely choose a latex collar. Just cut the collar down to fit your neck, so you don't feel strangled.

For more normal paddling, even in rough weather and in winter, you can get by with a neoprene collar. It is not as 100% waterproof as a latex one and if you end up in the water, a few drops may get in. But there is no danger of you getting chilled. A neoprene collar is experienced by many as more comfortable and less tight around the neck. It's a little easier to pull over the head and it also doesn't break as easily as a latex collar. At the wrists, however, you should always wear latex.

4. Easy to put on and take off - alone!

There are suits that have multiple zippers, sometimes even on the back. Others have so-called pee flaps at the bottom.

Keep in mind that the more zippers, the greater the risk of leakage: each zipper must be waterproof and completely closed. It should be sturdy and have a proper T-shaped handle. If it is on your back, you must have someone else help you to make sure it is properly closed. A long diagonal opening is usually enough for you to easily get in and out.

5. Features

Pockets for keys, phone, etc. are practical. They must of course be completely waterproof. Reinforcements on the knees and back increase the life of the suit. Fabric buckles on the outside of the latex cuffs and at the feet for warmth. There is often an adjustable waist skirt that covers the upper edge of the canopy and prevents water from entering the cockpit.

Some suits are equipped with a hood. Remember that the hood protects against wind, not water. On the contrary, they risk collecting water if you end up in the lake. Instead, we recommend some form of loose headgear, e.g. a woolen hat. Just make sure you have a spare on hand so you can change if it gets wet!

common questions

What is the difference between a drysuit and a wetsuit, and which is best for paddling?

A dry suit is exactly what the name suggests - a suit that keeps you dry. The dry suit keeps the heat relatively well, but it is important to have a suitable undergarment to get the maximum effect, for example woolen undergarments. In a wetsuit, the water penetrates into the suit, which is heated by the body and with the wetsuit's insulating ability, the heat is maintained. If you are going winter paddling, the drysuit is the best option because of its ability to keep you completely dry and warm. Although a wetsuit can keep you warm if you end up in the water, you run the risk of cooling down quickly when you get back into the kayak.

What does water column mean and what does it mean?

Water column is a measurement unit used to assess the waterproofness of a dry suit. The higher the water column, the higher the water tightness. A dry suit usually has a water column of at least 10,000 mm, which means that the material can be subjected to a certain pressure without water penetrating through. Långholmen Kayak's drysuits Valkyria and Inuit have a water column of 20,000 mm.

How long does a dry suit last and how do you take care of it in the best way?

A drysuit can last for many years if used and maintained properly. One way to extend the life of your drysuit is to wash it regularly. It is important not to use chemical products that can damage the material, mild soap and water works great. Store the dry suit in a dry and dark place and avoid direct sunlight to reduce the risk of UV damage. Avoid pulling or tearing the neoprene neck or cuffs more than necessary when putting on or taking off the drysuit, as this can cause wear and tear and damage.
Although the best quality dry suit will last a long time, its performance will gradually deteriorate over time, so it may be necessary to replace it after a number of years.

The 5 most important things you should consider when buying a dry suit

If a wetsuit extends the season, it can be said that a drysuit gives you season all year round - you can also wear it against rain in summer. It's easier to put on and take off than a wetsuit, and you have plenty of room for woolen underwear in the winter. The suit is therefore not warming in itself, but it will keep you completely dry if you end up in the water. So remember to have something under it if it's cold, and before you close the zipper completely, squat down to force out as much air as possible.

common questions